Owen's Lesson in Resiliency

Are you ready for a lesson in Resiliency? Meet Owen from Purrfect Totes! he has a few lessons he wants to teach you, and kids, about starting your own business and how tough it can be sometimes.

"My name is Owen and my business name is perfect totes. My favorite part of the program would probably be during market day because market day is when you get sales. You're so happy but then people don't come and you have to prepare yourself to get ready for people saying no to you and being denied. Everybody should take this program because it gets you prepared for real life. people are gonna say no to you, walk by you and say I'm gonna come back later and just run. So it's a great program to get you ready for people to say no and still say thank you."

Click here to view next semesters KidPreneur Program Schedule

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Kid entrepreneur programming is offered by Build a Biz Kids, a local non profit society focused on helping kids to develop and strengthen their essential soft skills. Students gain confidence, and learn foundational skills such as critical thinking, resiliency, financial literacy, leadership, decision making, self awareness, communication, public speaking, and so much more! Find out more about us and our incredible students at http://BuildaBizKids.com


Teamwork Makes the World Work

Think of anything in the world that has brought goodness, innovation, salvation, or anything else of the like, that was done with just one person. Think hard.

It's a quick answer, nothing. Yes, one person might have been the catalyst, the voice or the idea, but no "one" was able to do it alone.

Martin Luther King Jr, yup, he was amazing. He was the voice, the idea but he couldn't have made any change without his supporters, political figures (of good and bad) or the media, as limited in reach as it was back then.

How about a more modern example. Elon Musk. Yup, he's the voice, the idea, the vision, but he has a HUGE team behind him making the ideas become a reality.

Yes, learning entrepreneurship holds so many key skills that are critical to help any person excel in life these days, such as public speaking (often done alone), innovation & problem solving (often starts alone), and Resiliency (so important to have this within each and every person). But if you truly want to bring ideas to light, create a movement or have people around the world utilize your innovation, you must also learn how to work within a team; Not an easy task for many of us.

So how do you become "good" at teamwork? How do you learn how to play well with others and utilize a team to run faster and jump higher? The same way we do everything. Exposure, Practice, Reflection, and Practice some more.

The earlier we can expose children to working in teams, while offering leadership opportunities, the sooner they can learn to "switch" between the two, and yes, there is a definite art to the "switch". And "Exposure" isn't a one time thing. The more often they are exposed to teamwork situations, the more perspective and "Practice" they will earn. But don't forget about Reflection. Without this, the rest is a waste, truly. This is where you are a critical partner in this. Se below

When working in teams, and when practiced well with plenty of reflection, you can actually learn to be the BEST leader in a team environment.

  1. You Learn Empathy in a Team.
    If you have ever had a "bad boss" then you know how defeating it can be. Sharing ideas becomes less than exciting when the "leader" creates an environment of negativity or shuts others down quickly. This is where reflection is key. Often a bully is a bully because they were bullied themselves and did not take the time and space to reflect on that experience. For kids, it is easiest to want to lash out as revenge. It is up to parents, teachers and coaches to help them reflect with space so they can turn those experiences into lessons of empathy, rather than a demonstration of an "appropriate way to act".
          * How did this make you feel?
          * What would you have rather they said to you?
          * What would you do in that situation?
    Ask questions and allow them the space to answer and connect the dots.
  2. You Feel Confident in Your Weaknesses Within a Team.
    If you become a leader of others too quickly, you can often feel a heavy weight on your shoulders. You may feel like you should be a jack of all trades and know the right answer to everything. The reality is, you are probably really great at some things, and less so in others. When in a team, you get to seek out that which is diverse and unique about one another.
    Would you want to build a house with only a team full of plumbers? That's not too helpful. But, if you are a plumber and others on your team are framers, electricians, roofers, and so on, you can quickly learn that others bring massive value you can be thankful for, while also recognizing that the "house" couldn't be complete without you as the plumber. Leaders don't have to know everything. In fact, the strongest leaders know what they are weakest in and are A-OK with it. It is their job to create a healthy environment so that everyone can do what they do best.
  3. You Can Learn to Take Risks Within a Team.
    If you are the leader of a group, or a one-man-show, it can be more difficult to take risks on a new idea because if it fails, it's all on you. But in a team, you can take a risk by asking someone else who is "stronger" in that area to help, advise or contribute to what you are thinking. If your idea seemed like a good one in your head but you didn't think through the logistics properly, since it isn't your area of expertise, wouldn't it be nice if Jessica were there to help walk you through it? As a leader, who is usually in a position to make a final decision, if you don't look to your team for guidance, one bad, ill-informed decision can have devastating effects on you, the business, and everyone on your team.
  4. You Can Learn Leadership By Being Led By Great Leaders
    We have all had that one bad boss, but what about that great one? Or perhaps they were a great teacher, coach, parent, etc. What made you feel like you were contributing? How did they handle disagreements? Decisions? Before jumping into a leading role, watching others can help you gain perspective on the type of leader you want to be.

Sports are great team settings, so are group projects at school. But what if the stakes were higher? What if your child could get practice by working with a new group of peers to build a business and compete with another group doing the exact same thing? Tensions could get high. Leaders may emerge. Teamwork will have it's ups and downs. But no matter what, in the end, they will reach their goal of launching a business and raising money for a great local cause.

That's the basis for our Lemonade Stand Challenge. A 1 week, full time camp for students just 7-12 years of age offered in July & August. With that kind of diversity in age, incredible things can happen. Democracy is often utilized for decisions. Highs and lows are experienced with each new module they embark upon in their launch. But we didn't forget about reflection. Each day they have plenty of time to bond and be friends with fun in the sun!

This summer, seek out camps that encourage teamwork that works towards a goal. Where the kids are their own leaders, not the camp councilors, making "big" decisions and finding one another's strengths through the process. But then be sure to help them reflect on their experiences each day. Ask them questions and see what insights they have drawn. These skills and insights will fuel them for decades to come.

For more information or to view our Summer Camp Schedule, Click Here


4 Successful Summer Camps, Over $1000 Raised for Charities

What a Summer!!??!! A HUGE thank you to all of our parents, students & community who supported our KidPreneur Summer Camps! And of course, a Gigantic thank you to Vancity for the support and use of their facilities and our friends at each of the local grocers we were able to set up shop with! We couldn't have done it without you.

This summer, Vancity nominated 4 incredible local charities that the students raised money for through their lessons in social entrepreneurship with Build a Biz Kids.

    * SHARE Family & Community Services

    * 3030 Gordon Project 

    * Starfish Backpack 

    * PoCo Youth Services

All together, in less than 3 hours of hustle in each camp, about an hour per team, they raised WELL OVER $1000!

Through teamwork, determination, learning and execution, these kids have made a big difference in their communities.

Next up are our After School programs starting in September. Many of our Summer Camp Students have already registered but there is still space left.

Students in our after school programs start their own business, step by step, and   learn what it feels like to create a product that someone else wants, to hear no more than once and still be successful, to earn their own money and understand the value of it, and so much more!

We have 2 locations available in the Tri Cities/Burnaby area and the ages are broken up for 7-9 year olds and 10-12 year olds so we can really dive into the reading, writing and mathematics.

Click here to see our current schedule

Click here to see our program descriptions

Click here to register now

Don't wait long, many parents have already pre-registered their child and each class has limited space.


What Will My Kids Takeaway After Their Program?

Often as parents, when we spend money and time on our children, we, rightly so, ask ourselves what is the value in this? What will they takeaway or learn? Is it worth it?

This summer we are wrapping up the last of our summer camp programs and kids from 7-12 years have walked through as a team, starting their own Lemonade Stand Business.

Lemonade Stands have been around for a very long time and seem fairly basic. Get a table, get some lemonade and see if anyone will buy it that is walking by. What is there to teach that they couldn't learn on their own?

Well, let's step back a moment, shall we? In all aspects of life, any action we do can be done with a varying level of depth and effort. Sports, work, exercising, cleaning the house and so on. Likewise, a "business", or in this case, a lemonade stand, is the same way.

Have you been to Playland this summer or any local fair? Have you ever seen that BIG Lemon shaped stand that sells fresh squeezed lemonade (which is absolutely delicious btw)? Well, people pay their mortgage doing that. The only difference is the level they decided to take their lemonade stand vs what I did with my Kool-Aid stand as a kid.

On our summer camp program, kids learn about what a business is but also the information, brainstorming and action required to really make it a success.

They didn't just sell lemonade, they came up with different recipes, mixed them and then asked the public to try their concoctions for feedback on sweetness and preference. Information = one step closer to success.

Next, they came up with names, a brand, posters with which to attract attention and promote their business. Brainstorming & Teamwork = taking action that will get them one more step closer to success.

Then, it's the big day! Pressure is on. Time to communicate a message and convert passersby into sales. They role play, practice, watch videos on customer service and how to offer value. Information + Action = a BIG Success for any first business.

Of course they also understand their costs, profit, and pricing as bonuses.

But let's go back to the initial question. What will my kids takeaway after the program?

Here is a quick, tangible example. Meet Taiga and Rio. Two brothers who took on our Lemonade Stand Challenge just a couple weeks ago. Once their program was done, it appears that the entrepreneurial bug dug in deep and they decided to use what they learned and run with it! They started a Snow Cone Stand for Charity! How incredible is that!

We couldn't be more proud of these two and can't wait to see them this fall in our after school program where they can take what they have already learned and kick it up even more!

So, after your child's program, maybe they are inspired to sell something else? Perhaps they want to raise money for charity or save up for that new video game. Perhaps they don't start a business at all. But what they will take away is a new way of looking at the world around them. They will know that they can take on a challenge, step by step, and make something happen. They will know that everything has a cost, money and time, and that if they gather enough information, they can make decisions that can earn a profit or deliver a desired outcome.

True, our students don't come home with each day with tangible items such as hand made mugs or cards written for mom and dad. Instead, they come home with practical knowledge that can potentially empower them for a lifetime.

For more information on our Summer Camps & Upcoming Fall After School Programs Registering Now, Visit https://buildabizkids.com/as-adwords-%26-fb-landing


Is What You "Know" Losing You Money?

Today was one of the more interesting days for seeing development in our students during our Build a Biz Kids Lemonade Stand Challenge Summer Camp. Day 3 is all about creating prototypes of their product and then test marketing them with real people; A critical step in any business but more often than not, it's skipped.

No really, it is. Look at your business. When was the last time you gave a sample of your business service or product while in development to a customer and asked for their opinion on it from top to bottom, start to finish & encourage raw truth? And I don't mean an online survey with a score of 1-5 for satisfaction.

Let's take a Mortgage Broker or Real Estate Agent as an example. Many don't even consider their service to be testable or in development. It is what it is and I just do what everyone does. Advertise, have a coffee with clients, do my thing and then send flowers or a gift at the end. But services should be tested formally just as much as products.

The most dangerous entrepreneurs are those who made a tangible product based on their own personal need and fail to ask HONEST feedback on it from strangers. Tangible products cost a lot of money, especially when buying in high quantities so please, please, don't just ask friends and family. Stand on a street corner or go to your potential market and ask them to rip it to shreds. In fact, only ask them for negative feedback and see what you get. Best to know now then once you have spent $100k on a warehouse of widgets only 20 people might be willing to buy.

This is where What You "Know" Might Be Costing You Money. Because what you know is not always what everyone else is willing to pay for.

Day 3 of our Build a Biz Kids Summer Camp is a special day and a BIG eye opener for our students. As many parents know, kids taste pallets are not as developed and, therefore, sometimes their concoctions are not what they thought they would be.

For example, the Red team wanted to create a cherry lemonade & a lemonade and Sprite with pretty straws & pink tissue bows. The Blue team created an orange lemonade and mango lemonade with dainty lemon wedges on the cups.

One mixed, the Red team didn't like the tart cherry juice at all. (I think they envisioned grenadine and not real cherry juice). While the Lemonade & Sprite was better, only half of the team was ok with the tart lemon flavour and fizzy bubbles of the Sprite.

The Blue team battled it out but ended up scraping their orange lemonade due to the "yucky" factor and, again, were split over how successful their mango lemon twist would be.

After pouring and garnishing their samples, they went out into the world and found brave adults to try their mixtures. With notebooks in hand, they explained their recipes and asked direct questions about their product.

"On a scale of 1-5, how do you like the taste? How pretty is it? What don't you like about it? Do you have any additional comments so we can make it better?"

What surprised them was that adults like the taste of the tart lemonade and the feeling of fizzy Sprite on their tongue. They also liked the mango twist and thought it was tropical tasting. The kids who were very certain that no one would like it were a little confused but in a good way. They were relieved they had a recipe that might work!

"It needs to be colder though", "I wouldn't drink this in the morning because it's too sweet but in the afternoon it would be perfect!", "I feel like I should be in the sun drinking this! It's so tropical!"

The kids were sometimes confused by the feedback as some liked sweet drinks and others didn't. Some loved mango and others weren't as big of fans. They learned the value of note taking and, at the end, reviewed their results. The kids who were shy to talk to strangers ended up forgetting their were chatting with random adults because they were super interested in hearing the feedback and write it down.

Aside from becoming better bartenders, these kids explored some important lessons from the day.

- Don't assume your taste buds are the same as others.

- You can't please everyone, so go with the majority

- Don't assume you will get it perfect the first time but keep working on it

- Always welcome negative feedback. It does't mean you did anything wrong or should give up. It means you know more now so you can make it better next time. Negative feedback is just as important as positive feedback

We are often asked, what is the difference between your programs? Well, in the end, nothing, and everything. A child could take our program over and over and over again, especially our after school programs, and never have the same experience. We teach kids how to start a business and to skip any of these critical steps would be setting them up to fail.

While we dive deeper into concepts in some courses more than others, yes, your child will learn how to developed a product or service through exploring passions & solving problem. They will learn how to make a prototype and test it as much as possible. They will develop a marketing plan and test out their communication with a 30 second elevator pitch before going to market.

But guess what, we would make you do all of that too :-)


Dad's Inspiring Dad's

Build a Biz Kids is truly inspired by my 9 year olds ambitions. As a Dad I feel it’s my responsibility to teach my son to pursue his passions and empower him to create opportunities with innovation. I am inspired by parents who are encouraging their kids to realize a dream. When that encouragement extends beyond their own children and they are impacting a community of children, well… then I am in awe.

That’s exactly what’s happened in meeting our new friends Ramses and his son Max. At age 9 Max wanted to raise funds to attend a summer camp. His dad Ramses listened to all of Max’s innovative ideas to raise enough funds to get to camp. Inspired by his son’s ambition, Ramses decided to utilize his event planning experience and developed a business showcase event for not only Max but all of his friends.

What started as a lemonade stand has grown to become the second annual Entrepreneurial Family Fair: Tinypreneurs. The event will be happening on Saturday June 2nd at the Fraser River Discovery Centre. Max and his growing list of friends will be showcasing their entrepreneurial endeavors during this market day in New Westminster.

Build a Biz Kids is not only excited and honoured to be attending this event but to be associated with Ramses and the incredible work he has done with this community of Tinypreneurs. What Ramses devotion has highlighted for me is that when you commit to helping your child succeed, your impact goes beyond your home and impacts your community… and in Ramses case, hundreds of kids.

Be sure to check out this amazing event, come by and say hi to the Build a Biz Kids team. We will have an interactive booth with games for kids and a chance to win a family night out with tickets the Vancouver Giants, dinner for four and a gas card.

Event details are here: https://www.facebook.com/tinypreneurs/posts/879274518940834

Hope to see you there!


"Hey! Want Some Lemonade?"

There’s something invigorating when you get kids to work on a project. Today we set up a Build a Biz Kids lemonade stand for an interview with Tri-Cities News. We invited my son and his step-brother to help us out and we just love watching the ideas fly around the room.

“… what about this…”

“…Oh, we could do this…”

“… How about we try….”

Having these two support our non-profit start-up has reinforced exactly why we are so excited for this program. They are passionate and have unlimited ideas. With tools and encouragement there is a world of possibility ahead of them. These 8 and 9 year olds are asking questions about our business strategies and offer intelligent suggestions.

“… what about contacting the local schools to see if they would like to offer your programs to their students?”

"...have you thought about putting up posters at car dealerships and coffee shops? Moms and dads go there..."

As the table was set up, and potential customers began appearing we saw the transition from lemonade stand concept and design turn into a real micro-business that they could control & be proud of. Pretty soon we had set up an enticing display of lemonade… although our customer service skills were a little rusty to begin with.

“Hey, want some lemonade?”

eventually became

“Hi there, would you like to support a local charity with your purchase of a lemonade? We have regular lemon or raspberry flavours.”

As the day progressed and donations began to grow so did their confidence. There was a sense of pride in their efforts and the fact their efforts were supporting a cause. It’s an incredibly rewarding experience to watch a child’s ambitions become actions.

I’m exhilarated by the day of watching these two boys take leadership and cannot wait to see this multiply by up to 15 kids per camp this summer.

Our schedule for July and August 2018 is open for registration in the Tricities & Burnaby here


One Child Can Make a Difference. Just Ask Calliope

Way back when I was a kid, it seemed like fundraising was just a part of the curriculum. At Christmas I was selling Christmas ornaments or wrapping paper for school, in the spring it would be cookies or cakes at bake sales, and that doesn't even touch on the kids who had Girl Guides or Scouts or Soccer teams raising money for uniforms and equipment.

These days, kids still fund raise, but it seems different in many ways. Yes, times have changed and "rules" are different. When I was a child in the 80's & 90's taking my pledge forms door to door on my own wasn't anything out of the ordinary, nor was it really all that incredible either. It was just what we did.

Today, children can't go far on their own. This can be for many reasons such as laws, parenting styles or just plain old safety depending on the neighbourhood they are in. But does this change in society have to effect the level of independence a child can feel when taking on a fundraising initiative?

I couldn't help but be incredibly inspired by this young KidPreneur right here in our backyard. Ruben's Shoes collects shoes & donations as a registered charity for children in the Dominican Republic to offer them the resources for shoes and an education. As you can imagine, when local children hear these stories and the cause, many become moved and want to help.

There is an 11 year old who caught my attention with the inspired passion she had and action she took to raising enough money to donate over 1000 shoes! Just under 500 shoes this year alone. Her name is Calliope and she lives right here in the Tri-Cities.

So how did she do it? It was a lot of effort, I am sure, but one thing I know is that she had the support of a community behind her cheering her on. Calliope is a part of Sole Girls, a fantastic organization that encourages empowerment among young girls through physical activity. She also had the support of her community where she lives. For 3 years now, Calliope has had an annual lemonade stand to enable her to raise funds for Ruben's Shoes.

So, how can you help your child impact others? Give them the space to be inspired and then help them take action. Surround them with other change makers of young and old doing incredible things who can support them, as well as help you with offering the right amount of guidance.

Summer Entrepreneurship Programs are available where they can socialize with kids just as explosive with ideas and facilitators who can teach them the tools and steps to make their passion become a impactful in their community.

But most of all, make sure they know that even as one individual, they can impact the lives of 1000's of children in need, animals with no homes, or keeping our earth healthy.