Being Aware While Still Having Fun!

This weekend was a fun filled event for Build a Biz Kids. We were honoured to be volunteering at the Port Moody RibFest in the Kids Center where we had an information booth along with 3 games for kids of all ages. If you haven’t been to RibFest before, you missed out on a great event so be sure to put it into your calendar for next year.

But back to the topic of this blog. Every time we do an event we love people/family watching and observing others as it can help you to learn a lot about yourself as well as perhaps seeing through a child’s lens of the world and the people they interact with around them.

I have a few stories I would love to tell over the next few blogs that I hope will help you with your own personal journey of continuing to become a great parent and mentor to your children so they, will in turn, become successful and fulfilled adults.

The first story is an observation our VP noticed of a family of 4. Mom and Dad along with 2 kids between about 6 and 8 years.

We had 2 great games provided by the event, both along the same lines. Throw the ball or hit the puck into the wooden cut outs to test your skill & accuracy.

This family was undoubtedly having a wonderful family day together. They looked like any other family when they walked up, however, he just noticed that through their fun and laughter, they may have created a behaviour habit that we noticed wasn’t encouraging their children to try new things or take risks. Of course, once observing this, I encourage you to look in yourself, as we try to do, on whether we are also unknowingly do this as well.

Here's the innocent interaction that occurred. Each parent went up to the football toss to try their skill at throwing the football through one of the two holes in the quarterback cutout. Mom walks up and takes a try, misses and the ball bounces off the boards. The dad starts laughing very hard and encourages the kids to do the same. “Haha, you missed!”

Dad steps up and tries, misses as well. Mom roars in laughter and gets the kids giggling and pointing at dad and how he failed. “Haha, you suck!”

Everyone was having an innocent enough of a time and laughing lots which is always great but when the parents asked the kids if they wanted to try…. Unsurprisingly, each said no.

This exchange was short and innocent. Something I can see myself doing with my friends at a carnival when one tries to win the big stuffed animal and doesn’t even come close to making it. We all laugh and taunt them and it’s all in good fun with no ones feelings getting hurt. We all understand the spirit of the moment and it's a super fun time.

But in this moment, the parents are having a great time but have perhaps unknowingly created an environment where their kids don’t understand that “spirit” and have developed a fear around failing with witnesses. They have seen what happens to you when you “fail”. You are mocked, laughed at and told you suck by those you hope to have acceptance and encouragement from. Who would want to take risks in that environment?

I write this not to shame this family. Truly, we have all done this as kids, teens and adults when around peers. But like many instances, our kids haven’t developed their confidence yet and need reasons to try new things, not shy away from them.

All in all, it can sometimes be tough to understand context as adults when it comes to how you relax and converse with your best friend and significant other, vs when you are around your kids. Laughter, joking, and lightheartedness is strongly encouraged; just remember, the minds of children don't develop over night. They evolve based on the conditioning their environment presents to them.


Youth Charity Movement

The kids at elite academy have discovered the drive that comes when helping others.

As a team that met though academic advancement program, they began discussing ways they could make a difference in their community.

After much research they decided that the Eagle Ridge Hospital foundation would be well suited to receive their donations. These students sourced the most in demand products among their peers… Junk Food!

By setting up a snack shack at high school, these students are able to turn a profit on chips. This profit is turned around and donated to Eagle Ridge Hospital.

After hearing about their fundraising efforts, Eagle Ridge Hospital approached the elite academy students to suggest a specialized initiative. The hospital was gearing up for a campaign to raise funds for hearing aid recipients.

So far this year, the Youth Charity Movement has raised $750 which is half way to their goal of $1,500. Previous years they have raised additional funds for the same cause and show no signs of stopping.

Way to go! We are inspired to see youth helping youth!


Kids 4 Kids - KidPreneur Spotlight

Kids 4 kids – is there a more inspiring purpose for a business? It explains why I was instantly drawn to the energy of three siblings and friends at an event recently. These kids, all wearing t-shirts with simple but powerful messages, were full of charisma so I had to get to know them.

Tell me about your shirts, I asked.

“Our cousin passed away from pediatric cancer. We wanted to honour our cousin and raise money to support the hospital that helped our cousin” http://www.sickkidsfoundation.com/

What a powerful purpose to start a business with.

"How did you come up with the t-shirt ideas?"

“Our friend in Toronto wanted to help us commemorate our cousin and sent us some messages to put on t-shirts.”

I took a look at their collection and these messages are powerful with their simplicity. Messages include:

Un-breakable

Shine your light

Be yourself

I only do me

Trail blazer

I belong

I can and I will (my favorite!)

These amazing shirts can be found here: https://www.teehatch.com/stores/KaJape-Wear

The KaJaPe kids 4 kids seemed to be the life of the party at this market day. I had to know what inspired them.

“We like helping lots of people” they said.

If you saw them in action, I think you would agree with that statement.

I wanted to know, "What is the toughest part about running your own business?"

“The hardest part is when a customer says they will come back but they don’t.”

When asked what other kids could do to start a business, the KaJaPe kids 4 kids stayed true to their simple message:

“Find something you love to do or something nobody else is doing.”

I’m inspired to see kids taking action to make a difference. It was an amazing experience to meet these kidpreneurs and we are excited to see their journey.

Be sure to support them at https://www.teehatch.com/stores/KaJape-Wear

Do you know a KidPreneur doing great things who would like to share their story and inspire other kids? Please contact us at info@buildabizkids.com. We would love to meet them!


Advice from "TinyPreneurs"

What is entrepreneurship? - “problem solving” says one young entrepreneur at this weekends tinypreneur event. The event was an inspiring market day for kidpreneurs to sell their wares and for most – raise funds for a good cause.

“Do it for a good cause and you’ll stay motivated” said Kim – an 11yr old entrepreneur.

Raising money for a good cause was a theme at this years Tinypreneurs event. Children were selling products they created and designed with portions of proceeds going to various charities. When asked for more information on the charities the children lit up. Often, the response was about a family member who had an illness. Some were survivors but others were not. The kids spoke proudly about the reasons for donating the funds:

“In honour of my cousin...”

“So we can end the problem with….”

“So that less people have to suffer from…”

“Because this hospital helped my sister and I want to help them in return”.

These social entrepreneurs are an inspiration. When asked what advice they would give other kids who are thinking about being an entrepreneur – the girls at Wubble Slimes (Instagram: @wubbleslimes) said “find something you love and sell it because someone else probably will love it too.” They also advised using social media such as Youtube for “how to make your product” and Instagram “as a starting place for advertising” and Etsy as a great online storefront.

Belle’s Beads said the key to being an entrepreneur is to “Have no fear – be brave.” Amazing and simple advice we should all follow.

Alexa, from Alexa’s Bracelets, had this gem of wisdom to share with future kidpreneurs. “Even if you don’t sell anything, be proud of yourself for showing up and trying.”

It’s remarkable to hear the wisdom of these kids and highlights the benefits of the entrepreneurial mindset in youth. It begs the question, as adults, how much of this advice do we adhere to ourselves? Many "grown ups" can sometimes forget their "Why" for starting and growing their business and passion can quickly fade away. Once the passion is gone, pushing through hard times can be agony and often what stops our progress.

These kids, while incredibly special as individuals, the skills they demonstrated are able to be taught and given support in. If you have a child who is passionate about a cause and wants to contribute, how can you help and guide them through? Using the key advice of our TinyPreneurs from this weekend, Youtube, Google and so much more can be used as a resource for parents.

To take passion into action, you can checkout our Summer Camp programs at Build a Biz Kids and not only have your child learn these key skills, but also help them put it into immediate action. As a parent, your support is key so you will be kept int the loop daily about what they have learned and what is to come.

If you’re interested in your child learning social entrepreneurship, take a look at our summer camp programs here and register them today!


Dad's Inspiring Dad's

Build a Biz Kids is truly inspired by my 9 year olds ambitions. As a Dad I feel it’s my responsibility to teach my son to pursue his passions and empower him to create opportunities with innovation. I am inspired by parents who are encouraging their kids to realize a dream. When that encouragement extends beyond their own children and they are impacting a community of children, well… then I am in awe.

That’s exactly what’s happened in meeting our new friends Ramses and his son Max. At age 9 Max wanted to raise funds to attend a summer camp. His dad Ramses listened to all of Max’s innovative ideas to raise enough funds to get to camp. Inspired by his son’s ambition, Ramses decided to utilize his event planning experience and developed a business showcase event for not only Max but all of his friends.

What started as a lemonade stand has grown to become the second annual Entrepreneurial Family Fair: Tinypreneurs. The event will be happening on Saturday June 2nd at the Fraser River Discovery Centre. Max and his growing list of friends will be showcasing their entrepreneurial endeavors during this market day in New Westminster.

Build a Biz Kids is not only excited and honoured to be attending this event but to be associated with Ramses and the incredible work he has done with this community of Tinypreneurs. What Ramses devotion has highlighted for me is that when you commit to helping your child succeed, your impact goes beyond your home and impacts your community… and in Ramses case, hundreds of kids.

Be sure to check out this amazing event, come by and say hi to the Build a Biz Kids team. We will have an interactive booth with games for kids and a chance to win a family night out with tickets the Vancouver Giants, dinner for four and a gas card.

Event details are here: https://www.facebook.com/tinypreneurs/posts/879274518940834

Hope to see you there!


Tri-City News Hightlights Build a Biz Kids & KidPreneur Camps

The Tri-City News decided to come out on a hot day for a glass of lemonade served up by our very own Build a Biz Kids!

Featured on the home page of their website and an article in the Friday Newspaper, Ethan Ricketts & Nikolas Boal can be seen with big smiles knowing their hard work is helping a great organization like SHARE Family & Community Centres (as well as the excitement of being featured in the newspaper of course).

To read the Tri-City article, see the link below.

http://www.tricitynews.com/news/kids-learn-biz-tactics-with-lemonade-stand-challenge-1.23306237 


"Hey! Want Some Lemonade?"

There’s something invigorating when you get kids to work on a project. Today we set up a Build a Biz Kids lemonade stand for an interview with Tri-Cities News. We invited my son and his step-brother to help us out and we just love watching the ideas fly around the room.

“… what about this…”

“…Oh, we could do this…”

“… How about we try….”

Having these two support our non-profit start-up has reinforced exactly why we are so excited for this program. They are passionate and have unlimited ideas. With tools and encouragement there is a world of possibility ahead of them. These 8 and 9 year olds are asking questions about our business strategies and offer intelligent suggestions.

“… what about contacting the local schools to see if they would like to offer your programs to their students?”

"...have you thought about putting up posters at car dealerships and coffee shops? Moms and dads go there..."

As the table was set up, and potential customers began appearing we saw the transition from lemonade stand concept and design turn into a real micro-business that they could control & be proud of. Pretty soon we had set up an enticing display of lemonade… although our customer service skills were a little rusty to begin with.

“Hey, want some lemonade?”

eventually became

“Hi there, would you like to support a local charity with your purchase of a lemonade? We have regular lemon or raspberry flavours.”

As the day progressed and donations began to grow so did their confidence. There was a sense of pride in their efforts and the fact their efforts were supporting a cause. It’s an incredibly rewarding experience to watch a child’s ambitions become actions.

I’m exhilarated by the day of watching these two boys take leadership and cannot wait to see this multiply by up to 15 kids per camp this summer.

Our schedule for July and August 2018 is open for registration in the Tricities & Burnaby here


One Child Can Make a Difference. Just Ask Calliope

Way back when I was a kid, it seemed like fundraising was just a part of the curriculum. At Christmas I was selling Christmas ornaments or wrapping paper for school, in the spring it would be cookies or cakes at bake sales, and that doesn't even touch on the kids who had Girl Guides or Scouts or Soccer teams raising money for uniforms and equipment.

These days, kids still fund raise, but it seems different in many ways. Yes, times have changed and "rules" are different. When I was a child in the 80's & 90's taking my pledge forms door to door on my own wasn't anything out of the ordinary, nor was it really all that incredible either. It was just what we did.

Today, children can't go far on their own. This can be for many reasons such as laws, parenting styles or just plain old safety depending on the neighbourhood they are in. But does this change in society have to effect the level of independence a child can feel when taking on a fundraising initiative?

I couldn't help but be incredibly inspired by this young KidPreneur right here in our backyard. Ruben's Shoes collects shoes & donations as a registered charity for children in the Dominican Republic to offer them the resources for shoes and an education. As you can imagine, when local children hear these stories and the cause, many become moved and want to help.

There is an 11 year old who caught my attention with the inspired passion she had and action she took to raising enough money to donate over 1000 shoes! Just under 500 shoes this year alone. Her name is Calliope and she lives right here in the Tri-Cities.

So how did she do it? It was a lot of effort, I am sure, but one thing I know is that she had the support of a community behind her cheering her on. Calliope is a part of Sole Girls, a fantastic organization that encourages empowerment among young girls through physical activity. She also had the support of her community where she lives. For 3 years now, Calliope has had an annual lemonade stand to enable her to raise funds for Ruben's Shoes.

So, how can you help your child impact others? Give them the space to be inspired and then help them take action. Surround them with other change makers of young and old doing incredible things who can support them, as well as help you with offering the right amount of guidance.

Summer Entrepreneurship Programs are available where they can socialize with kids just as explosive with ideas and facilitators who can teach them the tools and steps to make their passion become a impactful in their community.

But most of all, make sure they know that even as one individual, they can impact the lives of 1000's of children in need, animals with no homes, or keeping our earth healthy.


Local Non-Profit Partners with Vancity to Teach Kids Fundraising

Build a Biz Kids – Lemonade Stand Challenge summer camp raises funds for Tri-Cities charities

A local partnership has begun building our future community leaders right here in the Tri-Cities. Build a Biz Kids is a not for profit summer camp and after-school program provider focusing on entrepreneurship and community engagement. In a partnership with four local Vancity branch locations, Build a Biz Kids will be hosting the Lemonade Stand Challenge, a Young Entrepreneur Learning Lab licensed program.

Throughout the Tri-Cities communities this summer, youth aged 7-12 will participate in identifying local charities that are supporting their community and have fun while raising funds for those charities. Through the concept of entrepreneurship, this program teaches kids how a collaborative and creative team can build a lemonade stand that makes a difference in their community by donating proceeds to local charity and learning about social entrepreneurship.

Of this partnership between Build a Biz Kids and Vancity, Leah Coss, President of Build a Biz Kids says – “We are very excited and honored to have found a partner who believes, as we do, in equipping children with practical skills which will better their futures and the communities they reside in. Every interaction with Vancity & their incredible employees has been so supportive but also action oriented which are the same values we strive to teach our students.”

Vancity has a vision to redefine wealth in a way that furthers the financial, social and environmental well-being of their members and their communities. Build a Biz Kids is on a mission to empower youth of the Tri-Cities to becoming engaged community participants. This partnership aligns these visions and missions through entrepreneurship. Entrepreneurial skills challenge children to think outside the box, create unique solutions, and become leaders at an early age. The entrepreneurial mindset teaches kids to take initiative, solve problems, think critically, make decisions, interact with people confidently and look for opportunities around them. These skills help to increase self-confidence and provide more opportunities for bright financial futures for themselves and their communities.